Taylor made

A surprise announcement popped up on my screen a few days ago, promising a rare Sunday treat. A free performance by Taylor 2 and the Paul Taylor Dance Company.

To meet the dancers for casual, behind-the-scenes chats. To walk into their rehearsal space.

To feel the dancing floor vibrate with energy. To share their youthful exuberance, dancing those springy steps away, in a choreography evoking an array of emotions, ranging from wittingly funny to melancholic, at times frightfully forthcoming and frank, with a touch of loneliness, marked by the shadow of war.

Paul Taylor 2 danced ”Company B” to the songs by the Andrews Sisters, expressing sentiments of Americans during World War II. Paul Taylor Dance Company danced ”Esplanade”, a choreography first performed in 1975 but managed to remain as fresh and relevant today as it was then. Music by Johann Sebastian Bach. 

While, as it transpired, this was actually a fundraising event, the money giving part was served very discreetly and humorously; so much so that most enthused members of the audience rushed to become donors, right after the last applause. And for a very good cause, I might add!

Taylor Studios
551 Grand Street

June 25th, 2017

A moment of national pride

An exhibition of a series of photographs by the official photographer of the 1896 Olympic Games, Albert Meyer. Traveling in U.S. cities, it arrived in New York where it was hosted at the U.N. Headquarters and the N.Y. Greek Consulate.

A rare opportunity to get a glimpse into events and athletes of the first Modern Olympics.

Beautifully arranged at the sun-drenched exhibition space, in front of the magnificent Peace mural by Candido Portinari.

Athens 1896: The First Modern Olympic Games
The Olympic Games of 1896 constitute a breakthrough in the history of sports events. The revival of the ancient tradition transformed international sports meetings into the global events we know today.
One of the famous photographers of that period was the well-travelled and American educated German, Albert Meyer (Dresden 1857-1924). Meyer traveled to Athens for the Games and became the official photographer of the German Team.
The 25 rather Spartan photographs of his album capture the chronicles of the Games, documenting both athletic rituals and the athletic labors of the participants.
The photographic studio and archive of Albert Meyer was destroyed in 1945, when allied bombings flattened Dresden, turning the original photographs into rare and priceless artifacts.
Among the members of the organizing committee who received one of the rare leather albums was its Secretary George Streit, banker and minister of the Greek government of the period. Marinos Yeroulanos, his grandson and President of the Board of Trustees of the Benaki Museum, donated the album to the Historical Archives of Museum were it is safeguarded today as a unique token to both History and Art. [extract from the exhibition leaflet]
December 9th, 2016

Takk Sigur Rós…!

For yet another transcendent experience. Even – or maybe because of – the rain. Even in an open stadium with loads of crazed New Yorkers who are completely unable to stand still and be quiet for longer than thirty seconds.

But for those of us who did listen, it was a two-hour beautiful, emotional, powerful, interstellar trip to the centre of the universe. Thank you Sigur Rós for showing us the way to the stars!

Until next time.

Forrest Hills Stadium
Queens

June 17th, 2017