Roosevelt Island Cherry Blossom Festival

The cherries blossomed late in 2018. But once the did, they were glorious.

To celebrate the cherry blossom season, every year, Roosevelt Island holds a Japanese cultural event with music, dance and performances. I loved the Taiko Drumming, and I wasn’t the only one. That long line you see above, was to catch the aerial tram to Roosevelt Island. I’d never seen such a long line at the station before – nor such crowds on tiny Roosevelt Island.

April 21st, 2018

Charles Towne Landing

In 1663, a group of eight aristocratic Englishmen received an amazing gift from their king: a giant piece of North America’s Atlantic coastline called ”Carolina”. King Charles II’s land grant gave these men – known as the ”Lords Proprietors” – millions of square miles of land between present-day Charleston and the Pacific Ocean. According the the king’s degree – but without permission from the native people already living here – these group of English lords assumed almost king-like power over the soon-to-be-formed colony of Carolina. 

It was 1670, when the Lords landed here and went on to establish the birthplace of the Carolina colony. Aboard their ship, were a group of free men and a few women, as well as slaves brought from Barbados, but descended from centuries-old cultures and kingdoms of West Africa.

Today, Charles Towne Landing is a State Historic Site introducing visitors to the brutal beginnings of Charleston – a city built on slavery and land appropriation – with an exhibition space appealing to history aficionados of all ages, a replica 17th-century cargo ship one can board and explore, wonderful gardens with an oak alley, trails for hiking, a natural habitat zoo… in short so interesting, they had to kick us out at 5 p.m. because they closing!

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

Charleston, SC

April 13th, 2018

Beyond Savannah || Wormsloe Historic Site

The oldest of Georgia’s tidewater estates, Wormsloe has remained in the hands of the same family since the mid-1730s. Claimed and developed by founding Georgia colonist Noble Jones, Wormsloe has successively served as a military stronghold, plantation, country residence, farm, tourist attraction, and historic site. Nonetheless, Wormsloe’s most characteristic and defining use has been as the ancestral home of Noble Jones’s descendants. [source & further details]

But, for us, it was the long walk under this wondrous oak tree arch, the omnipresent moss providing even more shade – or cover from the rain. It was raining that day but we still preferred to walk rather than taking the car down the avenue, like so many other visitors did. Because listening to the magic chorus of rain and bird song, inhaling that fresh, woody scent of rain as it blended with the earth and fallen leaves, was an experience we wouldn’t have changed for the world. Not even for a dry pair of shoes.

April 7th, 2018