The Great Tamer

Time

Humanity’s journey through time. Violence, Beauty, Ritualism, Abstraction, transitioning with each passing scene seamlessly, every brilliantly constructed moment sending electric shocks to the brain, heightening the senses, letting energy flow freely through the body. Life going full circle, tamed only be Time. The Great Tamer.

It takes a certain kind of visionary to conceive and direct a piece as complex as this, and make it feel so effortless and organic, sleek and elegant.

The Great Tamer, by Dimitris Papaioannou

With

Pavlina Andriopoulou
Costas Chrysafidis
Ektor Liatsos
Ioannis Michos
Evangelia Randou
Ioanna Paraskevopoulou
Drossos Skotis
Christos Strinopoulos
Yorgos Tsiantoulas
Alex Vangelis

Full credits BAM Program

New York Premiere, BAM

November 16th, 2019

Everything That Happened and Would Happen

Post-performance chaos, after the North American premiere of the epic production by artist and composer Heiner Goebbels, which poetically explored the re-enactment of history through performance, sound, movement, and moving image, a work commissioned by the Park Avenue Armory. Binding the pieces together were snippets from Patrik Ouředník’s 2001 Europeana: A Brief History of the Twentieth Century, read by the actors in different languages throughout the play (the book has been published in more than 30 languages). I was surprised to hear Greek being read, particularly because I couldn’t find a Greek name among the cast.

Everything That Happened and Would Happen

Park Avenue Armory

June 7th, 2019

Amargosa Opera House & Hotel

About five miles past the border line, in the middle of nowhere and well underway to the Death Valley, a building complex housing a hotel, a café, an exhibition space and an opera house. Marfa, for all its artistic weirdness, does not even come close – not by a long shot.

Here we are, at the Death Valley Junction, looking in amazement at the Mexican Colonial adobe building, constructed in 1924 to house the Pacific Coast Borax Company’s offices and labourers’ quarters, and a twenty-three-room hotel welcoming the mining town’s many visitors. Next to it, Corkill Hall – an entertainment centre with a built-in stage where the dances, weddings, movies, church services and other community events took place. 

We learn that in 1967, a flat tyre brought Marta Becket – a New York City born artist – and her husband, to this very garage you see in the first picture for repairs. While her husband was taking care of the car, Marta walked around the building, realised it was an abandoned theatre and decided there and then that it was waiting for her to bring it back to life.

Marta wrote in her memoir: “As I peered through the tiny hole, I had the distinct feeling that I was looking at the other half of myself. The building seemed to be saying, ‘Take me… Do something with me… I offer you life.’” [source: The Mojave Project]

Amargosa Opera House was born and it became Marta’s stage, home and life. She only stopped performing in 2012, at the age of eighty-eight. I was not fortunate enough to catch one of her performances – I hadn’t even heard of Marta Becket or the Amargosa Opera House and Hotel, before our trip in 2019!

I didn’t even realise then – not before I started reading more about it, that the hotel would probably be better known to many as the ‘Lost Highway Hotel’ from David Lynch’s Lost Highway (1997). But at the time, I was too busy peeking through windows, staring at Marta’s costumes and photographs….

April 21st, 2019

Reich Richter Pärt

Reich Richter Pärt, an immersive live performance and exhibition in two parts—one conceived by composer Steve Reich and painter Gerhard Richter, the other by Richter and composer Arvo Pärt—explored the shared sensory language of visual art and music. The Richter Pärt partnership built on a concept developed by Alex Poots and Hans Ulrich Obrist for the Manchester International Festival and featured a live performance of Pärt’s captivating choral composition surrounded by Richter’s new work, including wallpaper and three jacquard tapestries. [source: The Shed] & [short video: Gerhard Richter]

The Shed, Apr 6 – Jun 2, 2019

April 13th, 2019

Available Light || Lincoln Center

Available Light was a 1983 creation, a collaboration between three American icons: choreographer Lucinda Childs, composer John Adams and architect Frank Gehry, commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art, in Los Angeles.

The work was revived in 2015 and it was this updated version that we had the chance to enjoy as part of Lincoln Center’s ”Mostly Mozart Festival”, in 2018. Lucinda Childs’ interpretation of John Adams’ music that moves and unfolds like an expanding universe, was a deceivingly simple – in reality highly complex, energetic choreography, wonderfully complemented by Frank Gehry’s architectural set design.

A compilation of interviews with with John Adams, Lucinda Childs and Frank Gehry, with photographs of the original production, can be found in this 2015 article, by Julie Lazar, curator of the original work, in 1983.

Jazz @ Lincoln Center

July 13th, 2018

 

 

Twinkle Twinkle

Little StarZ

@Park_Avenue_Armory

Interdisciplinary artist Nick Cave created a dance-based town hall—part installation, part performance—to which the community of New York was invited to “let go” and speak their minds through movement, work out frustrations, and celebrate independence as well as community. 

The Let Go – June 24th, 2018

Nick Cave || The Let Go

Nick Cave’s wearable mops soundsuits invaded the entire ground floor of the Park Avenue Armory. When they started dancing, they were mesmerizing.

Nick Cave’s Soundsuits are wearable sculptures that combine performance and textile art. They are named for the noise Cave’s first suit made, when he wore it and started dancing around. They are often made from found objects and cover the wearer completely, so as to mask their identity.  The inspiration for the first Soundsuit, created in 1992, was the brutal beating of Rodney King. Since then, Cave has created over 500 Soundsuits.

Park Avenue Armory – The Let Go

June 24th, 2018

In Conversation – III

Finding our inner balance.

@Park_Avenue_Armory

Interdisciplinary artist Nick Cave created a dance-based town hall—part installation, part performance—to which the community of New York was invited to “let go” and speak their minds through movement, work out frustrations, and celebrate independence as well as community. 

The Let Go – June 24th, 2018