Liquid Music

In celebration of the album’s 10th anniversary, Sigur Rós vocalist Jónsi and his partner, musician Alex Somers performed Riceboy Sleeps, live for the first time, together with the Wordless Music Orchestra and Choir, in some of the most beautiful theatres across North America. Last night they were in Kings Theatre, Brooklyn. It was their final stop. And the best possible way to celebrate Halloween.

Below, a part of their live performance in Sydney. If the Northern Lights were emitting music, this would have been it!

October 31st, 2019

Wayne Thiebaut, Draftsman

Best known for his luscious paintings of pies and ice-cream cones, California artist Wayne Thiebaud (born 1920) has been an avid and prolific draftsman since he began his career as an illustrator and cartoonist. Featuring subjects that range from deli counters and isolated figures to dramatic views of San Francisco’s plunging streets, Thiebaud’s drawings invariably endow the most banal, everyday scenes with a sense of poetry and nostalgia. The show was the first to explore the full range of the artist’s works on paper, from quick sketches to pastels, watercolors, and charcoal drawings. It run @The_Morgan through September 2018.

Drink Syrups, 1964. Pastel
Nine Jelly Apples, 1964. Watercolour and graphite
Diagonal City, 1978. Graphite
Freeways Study, ca. 1982. Graphite and coloured pencil
Three Roads, 1983. Charcoal
Untitled (Intersection), 1977-78. Graphite
Circle of Fish, 1973. Pastel
Candy Ball Machine, 1977. Gouache and pastel
Spectacles and Bee Still Life, 1971. Charcoal
Tennis Girl, 1967. Graphite
Cakes No. 1, 1967. Pastel and graphite
Delicatessen Counter, 1961. Ink, oil, watercolour and graphite
Ice Cream Cone, 1964. Graphite
Untitled (Three Ice Creams), 1964. Pastel and graphite
Girl in Striped Sweater, 1965. Graphite

The Morgan Library

May 20th, 201818

The Morgan Library & its hidden gems

The great works of art, rare printed books, manuscripts and paintings by Italian and Netherlandish masters that adorn Mr. Morgan’s opulent library, are not exactly hidden but scroll further down to discover some really rare gems – usually hidden from view – that were on show at the lower level.  Thomas Gainsborough
Portrait of Caroline, 4th Duchess of Marlborough, ca. 1770


Inspired thirteen different English translations, printed in more than a hundred editions. This is the first edition in English, a legendary rarity. Why it is so rare, is hard to tell; perhaps the first copies were loved to death or the printing was curtailed by a miscalculation of the publisher. Only one other copy is recorded in an American library. The Morgan also has Heidi in French and German first editions, both in bindings with the same pictorial designs as these volumes.


To mark the seventy-fifth anniversary of the publication of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic story “The Little Prince”, the Morgan presents five newly discovered drawings by the author as well as intimate memorabilia from his time in New York during the 1940s. The items belonged to the American artist Joseph Cornell (1903–1972), who met Saint-Exupéry at the very moment the French author-aviator was drafting what would become one of the world’s favorite books. Cornell kept a dossier of papers and fragments that served as echoes of their encounters—everything from a marked-up cocktail napkin to an unpublished sketch of the little prince perched at the edge of a rose-covered cliff. Cornell’s Saint-Exupéry dossier was acquired by the Morgan in 2014 and is now shown in its entirety, for the first time, in the Morgan’s lower level lobby gallery.

The Morgan Library

May 20th, 2018