In Beacon

In daylight, Beacon is even quirkier than in the dark.

Fish Kill Overlook Falls
Howland Cultural Center
Howland Cultural Center
Lori Merhige || Soft Collapse, 2017 || Fabric, reinforced gypsum, aluminum
The Howland Cultural Center, Beacon 3D 2019
Ed Benavente || Starting from Scratch, 2005 || Cement, stainless steel, paint
The Howland Cultural Center, Beacon 3D 2019
Is it possible that someone lives here…?
Beacon’s Dummy Light has its own history and page on Facebook
Fish Kill Overlook Falls
Fish Kill Overlook Falls

Beacon, N.Y.

July 15th, 2019

All Eyes and Ears

Tal Streeter || Endless Column, 1968 || Painted steel
David Smith || Portrait of a Lady Painter, 1954/1956–57 || Bronze
Siah Armajani || Gazebo for Two Anarchists: Gabriella Antolini and Alberto Antolini, 1992 ||
Painted steel and wood
Anarchist # 1
Anarchist # 2
Alexander Liberman || Adam, 1970 || Painted steel
Louise Bourgeois || Eyes, 2001 || Bronze, silver nitrate patina, and electric lights
Mark Dion || Brontosaurus, 2016 (detail) || Mixed media installation
Ionic Columns, circa 1834, originally part of the Armstrong Mansion at Danskammer Point, New York

Storm King Art Center is a 500-acre outdoor museum located in New York’s Hudson Valley, where visitors experience large-scale sculpture and site-specific commissions under open sky. Since 1960, Storm King has been dedicated to stewarding the hills, meadows, and forests of its site and surrounding landscape. Building on the visionary thinking of its founders, Storm King supports artists and some of their most ambitious works. Changing exhibitions, programming, and seasons offer discoveries with every visit. [source]

Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, NY

July 13th, 2019

Mark Dion’s life-size cabinets of curiosities

Mark Dion
Bureau of Censorship, 1996/2019
Mixed media installation


Mark Dion
The Memory Box, 2016
Mixed media installation

Inside this shed are many little boxes, which visitors are invited to take off the shelf and open in order to discover the objects inside. ”I want to provoke a childlike curiosity and the anxiety of looking through your mother and father’s chest of drawers when they’re not home,” Dion has said, reflecting on the work.

Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, NY

July 13th, 2019

The Astronomers Monument @Griffith_Observatory

Astronomers Monument is a product of the great economic depression of the 1930s, when New Deal initiatives created federally-funded work programs to employ skilled workers at a time when they would otherwise remain idle and without income. One of the first of these programs, the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP), began in December 1933. Soon thereafter, in cooperation with the Los Angeles Park Commission, PWAP commissioned a sculpture project on the grounds of the new Observatory (which was under construction).

Using a design by local artist Archibald Garner and materials donated by the Womens’ Auxiliary of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, Garner and five other artists sculpted and cast the concrete monument and figures. Each artist was responsible for sculpting one astronomer; one of the artists, George Stanley, was also the creator of the famous “Oscar” statuette. The other artists involved were Arnold Forester, Djey el Djey, Gordon Newell, Roger Noble Burnham.

The six astronomers featured on the monument are among the most influential and important in history. The six figures represent the Greek astronomer Hipparchus (about 125 B.C.), Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543), Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), Isaac Newton (1642-1727), and John Herschel (1738-1822). Albert Einstein was considered for inclusion, but planers ultimately decided it would be inappropriate to feature someone still alive (the monument was completed in 1934; Einstein died in 1955). [sources: The Living New Deal & Griffith Observatory]

May 10th, 2019