Chihuly Garden & Glass

Enter the intricate, fragile world of Dale Chihuly – or, to be fair, the world of a small army of designers, glassblowers, sculptors and assemblers, working under the ”Chihuly” umbrella. Let’s take a moment to appreciate and recognize their work, even if we will never see their names in the credits.

It wasn’t the first time I saw a large ”Chihuli” exhibition, such as this. In October 2017, I had the chance to enjoy this immense work of glass making, in a truly magical setting: the New York Botanical Garden, in the Bronx. The gardens remained open in the evening and the sculptures, scattered all over the gardens and conservatory, were illuminated. The result was spectacular. There are several posts about that exhibition, the most popular being Into the Night”.

Seattle, WA

June 15th, 2018

 

The Narrow Face

Echo, 2011
Jaume Plensa

Jaume Plensa’s sculpture Echo is named for the mountain nymph of Greek mythology who offended the goddess Hera – she kept her engaged in conversation and prevented her from spying on one of Zeus’ amours. To punish Echo, Hera deprived the nymph of speech, except for the ability to repeat the last words spoken by another. The sculptor created this monumental head of Echo with her eyes closed, seemingly listening or in a state of meditation.

Another work by Jaume Plensa: Crown Fountain, in Chicago

2801 Alaskan Way, Seattle, WA

June 15th, 2018

The way we hammer art

without a nail

Jonathan Borofsky’s Hammering Man was installed right in front of the Seattle Art Museum, in 1991. Hammering Man is a series of monumental sculptures situated in different cities and was created in honour of the working class women and men of the world.


Daedalus/Upliftment, 2016
Acrylic, gold leaf, spray paint on canvas
Fahamu Pecou


Double Elvis, 1963/1976
Silkscreen in, synthetic polymer paint on canvas
Andy Warhol


Caterpillar Suit 1, 2007
Anodized brass wire
Walter Oltmann


Untitled, 1982
Acrylic, spray paint and oil stick on canvas
Jean-Michel Basquiat


Warhol/Basquiat, NYC August 1986
wowe (Wolfgang Wesener)


Birdcage
Wood, metal, ivoyr
Late Qing dynasty (1644-1991) or Republican period (1850-1920)


Leda and the Swan, probably after 1915 and before 1923
Oil on canvas
John Covert


Morning, probably 1933
Oil on burlap
Morris Graves

Morning is a deeply affecting image of retreat, of the pain of facing the light, of the fear of facing the day.


Catfish clan figure, 19th-20th century
Wood, polycrhome
Melanesian, Papua New Guinea, Guam River Region, probably Breri or Igana people


Seattle Art Museum

June 15th, 2018

The way we disappear

Blending in / Standing out

1/ Three Beauties: Kayo of Kyoto, Hitotsuru of Osaka, Kokichi of Tokyo, 1877
Woodblock print, ink and colour with metallic pigments
Kobayashi Kiyochika, 1847-1915
Meiji period, 1868-1912

There is a poem card above on the right, decorated with gold flakes, and inscribed with a haiku, which reads:

Oh to see moon and snow together
In the mountain of cherry blossoms

Works by Australian Aboriginal Artists: photos 2/ to 5/

2/Untitled, 1997
Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
Yala Yala Gibon Tjungurrayi

3/Untitled: Munglipa, 2014
Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
George Tjungurrayi

4/Swamps West of Nyirripi, 2006
Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
Ngoia Napaltjarri Polland

5/Yuparli (Bush Banana), 1993
Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
Dorothy Napangardi

6/- end
Project 42: Jono Vaughan 
Seattle -based artist Jono Vaughan’s series Project 42 addresses the pattern of violence against transgender people in the United States, providing both a form of memorialization and an entry point for engagement and discussion. Begun in 2012, the project’s name is taken from the short life expectancy of transgender individuals in the United States, which the artist estimates is forty-two years, based—in lieu of official census data, which excludes trans identities—on third-party texts and research. Eventually the artist plans to make forty-two individual works.

Each of the three dresses in this exhibition memorializes the life and death of a transgender person who was murdered: Myra Ical, Deja Jones, and Lorena Escalera Xtravaganza. Vaughan alters images of the murder locations and turns them into abstract textile prints, which she then sews into a garment. The style of the garment is inspired by the life and history of the individuals. A collaborator wears each dress in a performance that commemorates and celebrates the individual, an act that Vaughan describes as “the returning of humanity and the sharing of missed opportunities.”

Seattle Art Museum

June 15th, 2018

Roundup

An Ooh Oaah…! moment

Art: 

The First People, 2008
Red and yellow cedar
Susan Point

Drum with skull painting, 1991
Animal hide, acrylic, wood, bone
Susan Point

Mirror rack
Lacquer, bronze and cord
Japanese, 18th century
Edo period, 1603-1868

Seated figure, ca. 600-800
Ceramic and resin
Mexican, Veracruz

Crocodile headdress
Wood, skin, basketry
Nigerian/Cameroonian, Cross River, Ejagham

Seattle Art Museum

June 15th, 2018

 

Dedicated in Seattle

It was summer of 1907 when James Casey and his friend, Claude Ryan, borrowed $100, bought two telephones and two bicycles, hired six boys and founded the American Messenger Company that would deliver parcels. Did he know then, that his company would grow to become the giant multinational that we know today as UPS (United Parcel Service)?

This lovely little waterfall park is said to cover the footprint of the original Messenger Company and was built by the Anne E. Casey Foundation, which was started by James Casey and his siblings and named in honour of their mother.

Then, just a block away towards the Occidental Square and adjacent to the Seattle Fire Department Headquarters, another lovely surprise: the Fallen Firefighter’s Memorial, dedicated to all Seattle firefighters that have died in the line of duty since the department began in 1889.

Waterfall Garden Park is in 219 2nd Ave S.
The Memorial to Fallen Firefighters is a life size sculpture by Hai Ying Wu, in the junction of Occidental Ave S and S Main St.

Seattle, WA

June 11th, 2018

Fluorescent Light || Colour-Blocked Rooms

The next high rise project in Manhattan? Josiah McElheny
Bruno Taut’s Monument to Socialist Spirituality (After Mies van der Rohe), 2009
Glass and wood

This work reproduces Mies van der Rohe’s 1922 model for a theoretical, glass-clad skyscraper. But in a switch, McElheny replaces the clear windows with multi-coloured glass blocks. […] McElheny’s sculpture imagines a different history for twentieth-century architecture, one that embraced lively, transcendent spaces rather than the monochromatic monoliths of capitalism that evolved from Mies’ radical thinking.


Dan Flavin
Untitled (To Donna) II, 1971
Fluorescent light


Portland Art Museum

June 9th, 2018