Geometric Solids

Charlotte Posenenske, Series DW Vierkantrohre (Square Tubes) [Angular pieces], 1967/2018
Lee Ufan, Relatum, 1974/2019
Imi Knoebel, Raum 19 (Room 19), 1968
Robert Smithson, Leaning Mirror, 1969
Donald Judd, Untitled, 1976
Donald Judd, Untitled, 1976
Donald Judd, Untitled, 1991
Donald Judd, Untitled, 1976
Gerhard Richter, Six Gray Mirrors, 2003
Gerhard Richter, Six Gray Mirrors, 2003

Dia:Beacon

July 15th, 2019

Cardboard Yoga

Charlotte Posenenske || Series DW Vierkantrohre (Square Tubes) [Angular pieces], 1967/2018

”Before turning away from art production in 1968 in favor of a career in sociology, Charlotte Posenenske exhibited widely alongside peers such as Hanne Darboven, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt, with whom she shared an interest in seriality. However, her work is distinguished by its radically open-ended nature. Embracing reductive geometry, repetition, and industrial fabrication, she developed a form of mass-produced sculptural Minimalism that addressed the pressing socioeconomic concerns of the decade by circumventing the art market and rejecting established formal and cultural hierarchies.

Mass production and variability are also at the heart of Posenenske’s subsequent works. Series D consists of six shapes in galvanized sheet steel. While these elements resemble standard ventilation ducts, the tubes are nonetheless custom-made according to the artist’s instructions and sketches. Shortly after conceptualizing Series D, Posenenske created Series DW, a variant with only four shapes produced from lightweight corrugated cardboard. A ready-made material, cardboard nonetheless represents a departure from the aesthetics of the steel tubes, which are in effect almost indistinguishable, in form and provenance, from the functional elements that they refer to. Larger but more manageable than their sharp-edged steel counterparts, the Series DW components are also easier to manipulate.” [source]

Dia:Beacon

July 15th, 2019

All Eyes and Ears

Tal Streeter || Endless Column, 1968 || Painted steel
David Smith || Portrait of a Lady Painter, 1954/1956–57 || Bronze
Siah Armajani || Gazebo for Two Anarchists: Gabriella Antolini and Alberto Antolini, 1992 ||
Painted steel and wood
Anarchist # 1
Anarchist # 2
Alexander Liberman || Adam, 1970 || Painted steel
Louise Bourgeois || Eyes, 2001 || Bronze, silver nitrate patina, and electric lights
Mark Dion || Brontosaurus, 2016 (detail) || Mixed media installation
Ionic Columns, circa 1834, originally part of the Armstrong Mansion at Danskammer Point, New York

Storm King Art Center is a 500-acre outdoor museum located in New York’s Hudson Valley, where visitors experience large-scale sculpture and site-specific commissions under open sky. Since 1960, Storm King has been dedicated to stewarding the hills, meadows, and forests of its site and surrounding landscape. Building on the visionary thinking of its founders, Storm King supports artists and some of their most ambitious works. Changing exhibitions, programming, and seasons offer discoveries with every visit. [source]

Storm King Art Center, New Windsor, NY

July 13th, 2019

Bodies of Art

@The_Metropolitan_Museum_of_Art

Night || Aristide Maillol || Bronze, 1902-9
Constantin Brancusi || Sleeping Muse || Bronze, 1910
Edgar Degas || The Tub || Bronze, Modeled 1888-89, cast 1920
Edgar Degas || Woman Bathing in a Shallow Tub, 1885 || Charcoal and pastel on light green wove paper, now discoloured to warm grey, laid down on silk bolting
Philip Pearlstein || Two Models with Bent Wire Chair and Kilim Rug || Oil on canvas, 1984

June 1st, 2019

The Astronomers Monument @Griffith_Observatory

Astronomers Monument is a product of the great economic depression of the 1930s, when New Deal initiatives created federally-funded work programs to employ skilled workers at a time when they would otherwise remain idle and without income. One of the first of these programs, the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP), began in December 1933. Soon thereafter, in cooperation with the Los Angeles Park Commission, PWAP commissioned a sculpture project on the grounds of the new Observatory (which was under construction).

Using a design by local artist Archibald Garner and materials donated by the Womens’ Auxiliary of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, Garner and five other artists sculpted and cast the concrete monument and figures. Each artist was responsible for sculpting one astronomer; one of the artists, George Stanley, was also the creator of the famous “Oscar” statuette. The other artists involved were Arnold Forester, Djey el Djey, Gordon Newell, Roger Noble Burnham.

The six astronomers featured on the monument are among the most influential and important in history. The six figures represent the Greek astronomer Hipparchus (about 125 B.C.), Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543), Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), Isaac Newton (1642-1727), and John Herschel (1738-1822). Albert Einstein was considered for inclusion, but planers ultimately decided it would be inappropriate to feature someone still alive (the monument was completed in 1934; Einstein died in 1955). [sources: The Living New Deal & Griffith Observatory]

May 10th, 2019

Hollywood Busts

Similar expressions, millenia apart.

Bust of Belisarius, 1785-91 || Jean-Baptiste Stouf || Marble

Belisarius (about 505-565) was a Byzantine general whose military prowess was envied by the emperor Justinian, who banished and allegedly blinded the general. The subject was popular among French eighteenth-century writers and artists, both as political allegory and as a means of depicting the pathos of a fallen hero. Stouf skillfully rendered the crinkled skin around the eyes, the sunken cheeks, and the luxuriant curls of the beard and hair with a subtlety that belies the challenge of carving stone.

Belisarius at the Getty Center || James Dean at Griffith Observatory

Los Angeles

May 10th, 2019

The Alphabet of Art

Lee Krasner || Primeval Resurgence, 1961 || Oil on canvas
Alberto Giacometti || Tall Figures II & III, 1960 || Bronze
Robert Rauschenberg || Coca-Cola Plan, 1958 || Pencil on paper, oil on three Coca-Cola bottles, wood newel cap, cast metal wings on wood structure
Mark Rothko || Black on Dark Sienna on Purple, 1960 || Oil on canvas
Rosemarie Trockel || Untitled, 1991 || Enameled steel and three stove plates
Robert Gober || Untitled, 1998 || Wood, steel, enamel
Senga Nengudi || R.S.V.P., 1975|| Nylon mesh and sand
Dan Flavin || ”monument” for V. Tatlin, 1969

”Flavin’s work generates ambient light that reaches into the viewer’s space. The form, resembling a skyscraper, refers to a never-realized, but nonetheless influential, monument to an organization supporting Communist revolution designed by the Russian constructivist artist Vladimir Tatlin in 1920. It was to be a spiraling steel framework thirteen hundred feet tall in which rotating glass rooms would be suspended. Though utterly impractical engineering-wise, it remains an influential symbol of the artist’s efforts to combine art and technology. Flavin’s “monument,” despite its low-tech, small-scale nature, pays homage to Tatlin’s futuristic, utopian ideals.” [source: MOCA]

Robert Smithson || Mirage No. 1, 1967 || Nine units of mirrored glass
Roy Lichtenstein || Man with Folded Arms, 1962 || Oil on canvas
Cady Noland || Basket of Nothing, 1990 || Wire basket with assortment of building tools and materials
Julia Wachtel || Landscape No. 2 (Aerobics), 1989 || Oil, flashe, lacquer ink on canvas
Manuel Ocampo || Untitled, ca. 1991 || Oil on canvas

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

May 9th, 2019