George Washington Bridge (II)

Allow two hours to cross to New Jersey and back – extra time for walks in Fort Lee Historic Park, for more views of the river and Manhattan that will test your sense of scale. If you’re lucky, you may even make some new friends among the permanent residents of the Park. 

Sidewalks are shared by pedestrians and bikes. Construction projects may affect which side is open. Info about this and directions to the sidewalks can be found here.

George Washington Bridge (I)

February 19th, 2017

The play that never was

Three old friends and a neighbor. A summer of afternoons in the backyard. Lingering sunshine and inevitable darkness.

Caryl Churchill, one of Britain’s greatest living playwrights, returns to BAM for the first time in 15 years with this by-turns hilarious and unsettling daydream. Directed by Churchill’s frequent collaborator James Macdonald (Cloud Nine; Love and Information; John Gabriel Borkman, Spring 2011), with startling performances from Linda Bassett, Deborah Findlay, Kika Markham, and June Watson, Escaped Alone is doomsday in a teapot, a calmly revolutionary vision of looming collapse.

No, doomsday in a teapot was not meant to be that Saturday evening. The play had already begun and Mrs Jarrett – played by the courageous Mrs Linda Bassett – had already joined the three other ladies in the garden that sat behind the fence. But, as the conversation picked up, Mrs Bassett stood up and walked off stage, calmly, naturally as if it was part of the play. Only Mrs Bassett had been feeling unwell that day but had decided to go on with the show hoping she would manage to make it through. She didn’t, despite her strong will and professionalism; Mrs Bassett could not go on. And neither could the show.

The management offered refunds or rebookings to one of the following days and the play went ahead as scheduled. We missed it only because of a planned trip, our first away from the City since the day we arrived.

Escaped Alone, BAM
February 18th, 2017

The Glass[Water]Tower

A transparent sculpture by Tom Fruin made from roughly one thousand scraps of plexiglas. It includes such details as interior and exterior access ladders and an operable roof hatch. The locally-sourced plexi came from all over New York City—from the floors of Chinatown sign shops, to the closed DUMBO studio of artist Dennis Oppenheim, to Astoria’s demolition salvage warehouse Build It Green!NYC.

Source: Tom Fruin

Watertower 3: R.V. Ingersoll, by Brooklyn artist Tom Fruin, sits atop 334 Furman Street, Brooklyn Bridge Park

February 18th, 2017

Down Under

A walk, long overdue. Surely, we must have been the only newly arrived couple who waited six months to walk Down Under Manhattan Bridge Overpass – DUMBO to friends. But here we were, on a Sunday afternoon in February, mild and sunny and glorious, with our take of the iconic Manhattan Bridge seen from Washington St. and, true to word, from Down Under.

February 18th, 2017