It’s all about the movies

@Tut’s_Fever_Movie_Palace

Tut’s Fever is a working movie theater and art installation created by Red Grooms and Lysiane Luong, an homage to the ornate, exotic picture palaces of the 1920s. Inspired by the tomb paintings they saw during a trip to Egypt, Grooms and Luong covered the walls, floor and seats of the theater with hand-painted, Egyptian-style depictions of Hollywood royalty. Silent screen star Theda Bara works the box office, Mae West stands behind the concessions stand, and Mickey Rooney is the usher. Rudolf Valentino, Elizabeth Taylor and many others grace the walls, and each slipcovered chair in the theater features an image of Rita Hayworth. Visitors can open a sarcophagus to find a sculpture of James Dean lying in his tomb, cigarette still dangling from his mouth.

And a model-size piece of the City’s history @the Roxy

Hand for Mystic puppet, 1982
Designed and built by The Jim Henson Company
The Dark Crystal


Classic movie serials are screened in Tut’s Fever every weekday at 1:00 p.m., and weekends at 1:00, 2:00, and 3:30 p.m.

Museum of the Moving Image, Astoria, New York

May 13th, 2018

Museum of the City of New York

Kubrick or no Kubrick, learning about New York City’s past, present and future in a dedicated Museum, is fun. As is capturing Starlight, the brilliant light fixture by Cooper Joseph Studio which dominates its entrance and lights up the circular staircase.

Images:

Poster detail from the Suffrage parade through Madison Square, 1915. The ladies were dressed in white, emblem of purity, which was a way for more moderate suffragists to show their support for the vote.

Detail from ”Ruckus Manhattan: Wall Street-Newsstand and Lamppost, 1976
Papier-mâché, wood, plastic, fiberglass and vinyl by Red Grooms, Mimi Gross and Ruckus Construction Company

”The Truth Is… I See You”, speech bubbles by Hank Willis Thomas (b. 1976)
MetroTech Commons, 2015

A boot, worn by ”Mrs. Potts” in Beauty and the Beast, 1993-94

Museum of the City of New York, East Harlem, Manhattan

May 9th, 2018

SCAD || Opera In a Box

”There are twenty-four antique loudspeakers out of which come songs, sounds, arias, and occasional pop tunes. There are almost two thousand records stacked around the room and eight record players, which turn on and off robotically syncing with the soundtrack. The sound of someone moving and sorting albums is heard. The audience cannot enter the room. To see and hear his world, they have to look through windows, holes in the walls, and cracks in the doorways and watch his shadow move around the room.”

If you are intrigued, click on “Opera for a Small Room” for a video clip. This collaboration between Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, has to be one of the most powerful, multisensory installations I’ve ever experienced, totally immersive, even though one may not even enter the box.

SCAD Museum of Art – Savannah, GA

April 4th, 2018

SCAD || Moving Mountains

legend
poetry
spoken word
image
inspiration
moving

Stills from ”Moving Mountains”
a film by Yang Fudong


Yang Fudong is an important figure in the contemporary art scene and independent cinema movement in China. His films and photographic work, often derived from traditional Chinese painting, examine tensions between urban and rural, historic and present, worldliness and intellectualism.

The artist often presents works of epic scale and duration that invite the viewer into a richly crafted and layered experience. The exhibition features the U.S. premiere of his most recent film, “Moving Mountains,” a 46-minute, black-and-white film, as well as photographs from the film set, drawings and props.

The film is inspired by the ancient tale of a man, whom some called foolish, for seeking to move a mountain, and extolls the virtues of perseverance and collective action. The artist makes this story a poetic reflection upon human nature and the shifting values to which it can be subjected. Visually, the artist drew inspiration from a masterful ink painting, “The Foolish Old Man Removes the Mountains,” produced in the early 1940s by Xu Beihong. The film mirrors the spirit of endurance that Xu Beihong’s painting extolls. Yet, “Moving Mountains” also explores a new interpretation by taking the old story of the foolish man as an outlet for musings on contemporary realities. The spirit of motherhood is also central in the film and embodied in a character played by the famous Chinese actress Wan Qian.

SCAD Museum of Art – Savannah, GA

April 4th, 2018

SCAD || British Accent

Secret Society

First two images: Pia Camil ‘FADE INTO BLACK’

For the exhibition “Fade Into Black,” Camil presented the latest and largest iteration of her ongoing interest in T-shirts as repositories of cultural information. Specially commissioned by SCAD, one colossal fabric mass made of hundreds of repurposed T-shirts was hanging from the ceiling as a single soft sculptural work. As an object that might resemble a curtain or a theatrical backdrop, the piece featured a gradient leading the visitor from black to white or vice versa.

SCAD Museum of Art – Savannah, GA

April 4th, 2018

SCAD || To-day and To-morrow (and To-morrow…)

One of the pleasures of traveling is the discovery of museums like SCAD. Surprisingly stimulating, visually & intellectually, we found some of the most interesting, powerful and – why not, funny works, both within the brick walls of this magnificent 1853 structure that once housed a railway depot for the Central of Georgia Railway, as well as in the surrounding area outdoors. And to think that, before visiting Savannah, we had never even heard of SCAD!

Christopher Chiappa
LIVESTRONG Savannah, 2018


Melissa Spitz
”Do you need some Xanax? You’ll feel better”, 2013


Melissa Spitz
”I fell down and broke my jaw”, 2012


Toyin Ojih Odutola
Waiting for Supper, 2017
Charcoal, pastel and pencil on paper


Toyin Ojih Odutola
The Abstraction of a Continent, 2017-2018
Charcoal, pastel and pencil on paper


Mariana Castillo Deball, “To-Day, February 20th,”

For her exhibition at the SCAD Museum of Art, Castillo Deball presented the most recent iteration of the project “To-Day,” which combines historical research about a specific site and a physical form that contains this research, which the artist calls a “fictional character.”

This ongoing project is founded in a set of parameters that the artist herself has set:

“Each time the piece takes place, the character is shaped by this one-day history. It is important to mention that the date is decided by the situation and not by the artist. The date always coincides with the official opening of the exhibition, in this case the 20th of February. The documentation and visual material departs from newspapers, travel logs, birthdates, obituaries, holidays, observances and any other traces related to this particular date. ‘To-Day’ is an archive of events, with an arbitrary point in common. The piece will be completed after 365 editions.”


SCAD Museum of Art – Savannah, GA

April 4th, 2018

SCAD & the No-See-Ums

There are, I’m sure, many wonderful places that slipped under our radar, but two things are impossible to miss in Savannah: SCAD and the No-See-Ums.

SCAD, The Savannah College of Art and Design, with classrooms housed in some of the most beautiful buildings all over the city, its facilities including cafes, sports centres, health centres, an urban farm, a theatre, a fantastic bookstore with art supplies, galleries and a Museum of Art – you turn your head and a SCAD facility will most likely pop up!

Then, there are those blood thirsty, microscopic gnats called no-see-ums. They are everywhere. Legions of them. You won’t see them coming but, oh boy, will you feel their bite!

Looking for a no-see-ums safe area, we arrived at SCAD Museum of Art. Ushered in by Paola Pivi’s cute bears, relief was immense, if only temporary.

SCAD Museum of Art – Savannah, GA

April 4th, 2018