Amazing Spider-Man

The ultimate mid-August afternoon fun!

The Wings of the Vulture! Cover, May 1972. Penciled by Gil Kane || Inked by John Romita
Happy Birthday, Part Three p.p, 28-29, December 2003. Penciled by John Romita Jr. || Inked by Scott Hanna
Wolfhunt! Page 1, October 1973. Penciled by Ross Andru || Inked by John Romita
The Birth of a Super-Hero! Page 1, November 1966. Art by John Romita
The Vulture’s Prey Page 1, September 1968. Penciled by John Romita || Inked by Mickey Demeo

The Final Chapter Page 3. Art by Steve Ditko
The Final Chapter Page 4. Art by Steve Ditko
The Final Chapter – Art by Steve Ditko

Sunday Strip, January 21, 1979. Art by John Romita

The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man. Sketch pages, January 1984
The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man, Page 1. Penciled by Ron Frenz || Inked by Terry Austin
The Night of the Prowler Page 16, November 1969. Penciled by Jon Buscema || Inked by Jim Mooney
And Death Shall Come Page 10, November 1970. Penciled by Gil Kane || Inked by John Romita
And Death Shall Come Page 10, November 1970. Penciled by Gil Kane || Inked by John Romita
To Smash a Spider Page 17, December 1970. Penciled by Gil Kane || Inked by John Romita
In the Grip of the Goblin, Unpublished cover, June 1917. Penciled by Gil Kane || Inked by Frank Giacoia

 

August 15, 2017 @ The Society of Illustrators

The first ever exhibition of original Spider-Man with artwork mainly by John Romita but also my two favourites, Steve Ditko and Gil Kane; including Todd McFarlane, John Buscema, Ross Andru, Gil Kane, Ron Frenz, Keith Pollard, John Romita Jr. and others.

The exhibit runs through August 26th, 2017.

You’re welcome!

Crossword on a felt board

Rivane Neuenschwander (1967)

Watchword, 2012

For this work the artist, who was born in Belo Horizonte but lives and works in London,  has embroidered words borrowed from the language of protest – take, back, justice, trade, war, corrupt, revolution, system, democracy, over – onto fabric tags similar to those used for clothing labels. Visitors were encouraged to take a tag, either to sew onto their clothes or to pin to the board. In both cases the migrating and accumulating words formed a poetic, global map of resistance.

I pinned ”Public” on top of ”Justice” on the board – my contribution to the resistance.

The Jewish Museum

January 8th, 2017

Her insatiable appetite for society

John Singer Sargent, Elsie Meyer, 1908. Charcoal on paper.

Elsie Meyer (1885-1954), seen as a child in Sargent’s group portrait, became a fashionable young woman. In a 1903 letter to her brother Frank, her mother* described her ”insatiable appetite for society”, her gowns from Worth and Doucet in Paris, and the lavish preparations for her society debut. A few years later, Sargent depicted her in a simple cotton blouse.

*Lady Meyer demonstrated excellence in social skills herself: a society hostess known for her exuberant soirées, enchanting voice and support of the arts, but also a socially concerned philanthropist supporting working class women, underprivileged families, and women’s suffrage.

(Notes from The Jewish Museum’s website)

January 8th, 2017

The French touch

Recently, the Jewish Museum presented the first U.S. exhibition on the work of French designer and architect Pierre Chareau (1883–1950). On show were mainly furniture and lighting fixtures, as well as designs for Maison de Verre, the glass house completed in Paris in 1932, in collaboration with Dutch architect Bernard Bijvoet (1889-1979) and craftsman metalworker Louis Dalbet.

Chareau’s designs were complemented by pieces from his personal art collection, since both he and his wife Dollie were active collectors.

But I only had eyes for these sleek, stylish pieces of furniture and fixtures created in the 1920s, yet so modern they could have come right out of a Manhattan penthouse overlooking Central Park.

Take your pick:

La Religieuse (the nun) floor lamp, ca. 1923. Mahogany and alabaster with metalwork by Louis Dalbet.
Sofa, 1923. Rosewood with fabric upholstery.
Telephone table, ca. 1924. Walnut and patinated iron. La Petite Religieuse (the little nun), table lamp ca. 1924. Walnut, alabaster and patinated iron, metalwork by Louis Dalbet.
La Religieuse (the nun) floor lamp, ca. 1923. Mahogany and alabaster with metalwork by Louis Dalbet.
Coat and hat rack designed for La Maison de Verre ca. 1931. – Metalwork by Louis Dalbet. Stool, ca. 1923. Mahogany and mahogany-veneered wood. – Bookcase with swivelling table, ca. 1930. Walnut and black patinated iron. – Ceiling lamp, ca. 1923. Patinated brass and alabaster.
From ”The grand salon de la Maison de Verre”. Corbeille (basket) sofa, 1923. Wood and velours, with tapestry upholstery by Jean Lurçat. – Telephone fan table, ca. 1924. Wood. – High backed chauffeuse (fireside armchair), ca. 1925.

Pierre Chareau: Modern Architecture and Design exhibition ran between November 2016 – March 2017. You can read and browse through more photos on The Jewish Museum website.

January 8th, 2017