Liquid Music

In celebration of the album’s 10th anniversary, Sigur Rós vocalist Jónsi and his partner, musician Alex Somers performed Riceboy Sleeps, live for the first time, together with the Wordless Music Orchestra and Choir, in some of the most beautiful theatres across North America. Last night they were in Kings Theatre, Brooklyn. It was their final stop. And the best possible way to celebrate Halloween.

Below, a part of their live performance in Sydney. If the Northern Lights were emitting music, this would have been it!

October 31st, 2019

David Bowie Is…

Farewell to April and farewell to David, who is now and forever somewhere else. First time I listened to his music again, since he became immortal in 2016. It was well curated, the exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum, a bit smaller than the original in the V&A but, after David’s passing, all the more emotional.

Back to Manhattan, into the alien world of NYC Subway. Ensamble Ferroeléctrico de Marte, anonymous musicians with iron masks that look like animals. Music for the urban jungle.

April 29th, 2018

PS: My take of the original exhibition in V&A London in 2013, is here{x}

Dancin’ & Bridgin’

Café Müller, Pina Bausch’s dreamy masterpiece
The Rite of Spring, Pina’s interpetation of Stravinsky’s groundbreaking work
Brooklyn Bridge, no intro necessary

Three iconic creations, so visionary and inspirational, it is easy to believe they have always been here, evolving organically since the beginning of time. 

In 1984, Tanztheater Wuppertal made its New York debut at BAM, performing what would become the two most iconic works of Pina Bausch’s extraordinary repertoire. More than three decades later, the company returned with a landmark restaging of that historic double bill. 

Images show the transformation of the stage from a café, in which figures dance dreamily to the music by Henry Purcel, to a dirt field where dancers perform a wild ritualistic routine in honour of spring – a transformation that earned the crew their very own, heartfelt applause; alternating with images of one of the City’s most iconic structures, at dusk.

Café Müller/The Rite of Spring, was part of 2017 Next Wave Festival at BAM. The Brooklyn Bridge is part of the City, since 1883.

September 24th, 2017

They come in all sizes

Museums come in all shapes and sizes, integral parts of our society and pivotal in preserving, studying and expanding knowledge about the culture, heritage and nature of our world. And in an ethnically diverse metropolis of the magnitude of New York City, Museums come in every conceivable type: from the matchbox Mmuseumm to the jewel box Frick Collection, the Ambassador of Modernism that is the MoMA to the National Museum of the American Indian, advocate of Native American heritage, there are weird museums, pop up museums, museums of gigantic proportions like The Met; there is something for every interest, taste and even physical condition.

The Brooklyn Museum falls under the category of those Tardis-like structures that are surprisingly ”bigger on the inside”. How else can I explain the seemingly endless space when, after going through the galleries hosting the extensive Georgia O’Keeffe exhibition occupying -what we thought was- the largest part of the Museum, we found ourselves walking through corridors and galleries, monumental installations and even reconstructed period rooms, only to end up in this vast open space, its glass-tile floor reflecting the natural light coming from a skylight as large as the ceiling, enhanced by a huge chandelier?

It was only afterwards I looked it up and realised we had just visited the third largest Museum in New York City! This is the ”Beaux-Arts Court”, where the portraits of Washington A. Roebling and his wife, Emily Warren Roebling, fittingly hang side-by-side. Mr. Roebling was the chief engineer during the construction of Brooklyn Bridge, visible through the window in his portrait. When he fell ill, it was his wife who stepped in and oversaw its completion. Mrs. Roebling was the first person to cross the bridge, carrying a rooster for good luck.Portrait of Washington A. Roebling, 1899 by Théobald Chartran
Portrait of Emily Warren Roebling, 1896, by 
Charles-Émile-Auguste Carolus-Duran

Brooklyn Museum

July 22nd, 2017

Haunted

By benign spirits.

1/Henry Trippe House; Secretary, Maryland; c. 1730
Major Henry Trippe, a gentleman landowner and planter of English origin, built this one-and-a-half story brick home he called ”Carthagena” between 1724 and 1731 on land he head inherited from his father. The house faced the head of Secretary Creek on the eastern shore of Maryland. This orientation indicates the importance of water access before the development of good roads.

Greatly altered, the house still stands on its original site. A model and its living room can be viewed at the Brooklyn Museum, one of the twenty-three American period rooms installed as part of the Museum’s decorative arts collection.

2/Raphael Soyer (American, born Russia, 1899-1987); Café Scene, ca. 1940; oil on canvas
Raphael Soyer had a lifelong interest in the daily lives of working-class New Yorkers. His paintings of lone women in the early 1940s suggest the absence of husbands or sweethearts who had been called up to serve in WWII.

3/Luigi Lucioni (American, born Italy, 1900-1988); Paul Cadmus, 1928; oil on canvas
Luigi Lucioni and Paul Cadmus probably met as students, and they doubtless shared acquaintances within New York’s circles of gay artists and writers.

4/Reginald Marsh (American, 1898-1954); The Bowl, 1933; egg tempera on pressed wood panel
In this vivid Depression-era painting of one of the wild “bowl” rides at Coney Island, friends and strangers alike are thrown into contact by the overpowering centrifugal force. Reginald Marsh described the chaotic tangle of female bodies with the sensual physicality for which his work was best known.

5/Abbott H. Thayer (American, 1849-1921); The Sisters, 1884; oil on canvas
The women in this portrait were Bessie (left) and Clara Stillman, the sisters of the powerful financier James Stillman.