Frida & I

And a lot more on display in Brooklyn Museum.

Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving was ongoing, a collection of her clothing, jewelry, and other personal possessions like her corsets and prosthetics (themselves works of art), which were rediscovered and inventoried in 2004 after being locked away since Kahlo’s death, in 1954. Photography was strictly prohibited and all I managed was a couple of sneak pics. But, as is always the case in a museum, a whole world of other treasures is waiting to be discovered, photographed, and shared.

Ceremonial Wine Vessel on a Wheeled Phoenix, early 18th century
China, Qing dynasty


Head of Wesirwer, Priest of Montu
Green schist
Late Period, Dynasty XXX, ca 380-342 B.C.


Figure of a Recumbent Jackal (God Anubis)
Wood
Late Period-Ptolemaic Period, ca. 664-30 B.C.E.
From Saqqara


Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving


Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving


Ran Hwang (South Korean, b. 1960)
East Wind, 2012
Plastic and metal buttons and beads, metal pins, wood panel


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregation 18-JA006 (Star 1), 2018
Mixed media with Korean mulberry paper


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations (detail)


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregation 15-AU043, 2015
Mixed media with Korean mulberry paper


Philip Pearlstein, b. 1924
Portrait of Linda Nochlin and Richard Pommer, 1968
Oil on canvas


Joan Semmel, b. 1932
Intimacy-Autonomy, 1974
Oil on canvas


Brookyn Museum

February 16th, 2019

The Bittersweet Past of Domino Park

The Dancing Cranes and Disappearing Act you saw yesterday and the day before, are some of the historic features that render a walk along the Domino Park all the more fun.

The 80-foot tall Gantry Cranes were used to unload bulk sugarcane from freight ships for storage at the Raw Sugar Warehouse, 21 columns of which stand in their original place along the Elevated Walkway (not pictured).

The bridge with the misters performing the Disappearing Act, stands in front of the Syrup Tanks, four of the fourteen large-scale tanks that were used to collect high volumes of liquid sweetener generated in sugar processing, dating back to the 1950s.

And the magnificent industrial brick giant you see below is none other than the Domino Sugar Refinery, closed in 2004 after 150 years production of the white sweet crystals we now love to hate. The entire building is undergoing renovation, with the facade being preserved in its entirety and the interior converted into ”creative office space”.

The Domino Park website shows many of the park’s features today next to black & white photos of their original use accompanied by historical notes, from where the following  excerpt:

“Because of its ease of access by larger shipping vessels, Frederick C Havemeyer Jr. selected this area in 1856 to establish the F. C. Havemeyer & Company refinery, which would eventually become known as the Domino Sugar Refinery. At its peak in 1919, the Domino Sugar Refinery employed approximately 4,500 workers from a wide range of backgrounds and ethnicities.

Immigrants from Germany, Poland, Ireland and other European countries — and in its later years — Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and other people of Caribbean descent as well as African Americans all endured difficult working conditions at the Refinery in search of opportunity and prosperity. While the Refinery figured prominently in the explosive growth of Williamsburg’s industry and economy, it is the diversity of community surrounding this site that has become its lasting legacy.”

August 21st, 2018

The Disappearing Act

”Spanning a collection of historic timber piles, one look underneath the bridge reveals that most of Domino Park is actually situated over water, on a pier once supported by nearly 1,200 of these wood piles. A set of misters surrounding the bridge emit a gentle cloud of fog that envelop passersby in the shoreline’s wind patterns.” [@DominoPark]

PS: The fog is lit up at night.

August 21st, 2018

A/D/O || ENVIRONS

A/D/O is a space set up in Greenpoint, Brooklyn for the local creative community. It takes its name from the Amalgamated Drawing Office, a team led by Sir Alec Issigonis that built the very first MINI in 1959.

Spirit of the City was a modular system of revolving mirrored columns set on a grid configuration.

The installation ”explored the physical and emotional response that individuals experience when navigating urban environments” i.e. offered infinite instagrammable moments to a young hip crowd.

By United Visual Artists.

A/D/O and environs – a walk in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

August 21st, 2018

Trip Hoppin’ w/Escher

A master manipulator of architecture and perspective, creator of geometric paradoxes, aka M.C. Escher.

Extase, 1922
Samuel Jessurun de Mesquita (M.C. Escher’s mentor)
Woodcut


Castle in the Air, 1928
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut


Tower of Babel, 1928
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut


Emblemata, 1932
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut


Dream (Mantis Religiosa), 1935
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut


Tropea, Calabria, 1931
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Lithograph


Lion of the Fountain in the Piazza at Ravello, 1932
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Wood engraving


”The crucial turning point in Escher’s artistic development was his second trip to Southern Spain in 1936. There, he visited famous Moorish architectural landmarks, such as the Alhambra Palace in Granada and the Mezquita in Cordoba. These visits inspired him to methodically study the patterns that 14th-century artisans used to decorate the walls and the arches of the Moorish monuments. He then developed a passion for tessellation: geometric decoration in which triangles, stars or squares are repeated like tiles to cover a plane without leaving any gaps. He meticulously produced 137 watercolours showing different motifs of tessellation in an exercise book. These motifs represented 17 different ways of filling a flat surface with regular patterns and included a study of various colouring possibilities.”


Hand with Reflecting Sphere (self-portrait) in Spherical Mirror, 1935
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Lithograph


Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell), 1960
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut, printed from two blocks


Circle Limit III, 1959
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Woodcut, printed from five blocks


Depth, 1955
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Wood engraving and woodcut, printed from three blocks


Drawing Hands, 1948
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Lithograph


Ascending and Descending, 1960
Maurits Cornelis Escher
Lithograph


From ”Escher: The Exhibition and Experience” – a travelling exhibition that ran in Industry City from June 2018 February 2019.

Brooklyn, N.Y.

August 4th, 2018