Orlando @Aperture

Twenty-seven years after starring in Orlando, a film adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel, Tilda Swinton became a guest-editor in the Aperture 235 – Summer 2019 issue, and curator of an accompanying exhibition around the theme of the gender fluid, extraordinary character that is Orlando.

Some days ago we saw Tilda Swinton in conversation with B. Ruby Rich. Today, time for the exhibition.

Virginia Woolf, Orlando: A Biography, 1928 & Tilda Swinton’s ring from Orlando, 1992
Gail Albert Halaban || Necklace, Via Pietro Maestri, Milan, February 2017
Ethan James Green || Young New York Portfolio
Collier Schorr || Untitled (Casil), 2015-18
Collier Schorr || Untitled (Casil), 2015-18
Collier Schorr || Untitled (Casil), 2015-18
Collier Schorr || Untitled (Casil), 2015-18
Collier Schorr || Untitled (Casil), 2015-18

Collier Schorr has long been interested in how a body changes. For several years, she followed a model named Casil McArthur, who transitions over the course of Schorr’s project Untitled (Casil) from boyish girl to girlish boy, from artist’s muse to Bowie-like chameleon. Schorr remembers meeting Casil just as Casil had begun to start modeling as a young man rather than as a young woman. When Casil first began to transition, he worried about his future as a model. But the partnership with Schorr was perfectly legible within the fashion world, with fashions moving away from his/her clothing and toward the concept of they/them. Schorr explains that Casil’s fantasmatic appeal may have changed as he transitioned, but the mystery and the enigmatic quality that a model must project remained constant.

Viviane Sassen || Penicilline, 2019 || From Venus & Mercury series, 2019
Original photobook of preproduction images made by Sally Potter to help secure the funding for the film Orlando, 1988

Aperture, New York

June 5th, 2019

It’s only Rock and Roll

The Met rocks. Sometimes literally.

Ludwig drum set, purchased by Ringo Starr from London’s Drum City music store in 1963. The shop’s owner, Ivor Arbiter, designed the Beatles’ ”drop-T” logo on the bass drum head so Ringo could also retain the Ludwig logo.

George Harrison acquired this Club 40, his first electric guitar, in 1959, and used it in shows at Liverpool’s Casbah Coffee Club, where the young Beatles had their first residency as the Quarrymen.


”Love Drops” electric guitar, Flying V, originally painted by Jimi Hendrix, 1967

Though known for playing Fender Stratocasters, Jimi Hendrix played this Gibson Flying V extensively from 1967 to 1969. He modified the nut and strap button and painted the instrument himself, using nail polish. When Hendrix gave the guitar to Mick Cox of the Irish band Eire Apparent in 1969, Cox refinished it in black and removed the original design. In the 1990s, session musician Dave Brewis acquired the instrument and restored Hendrix’s original paint job.


”Number One”, ca. 1963 Electric guitar, Composite Stratocaster

Stevie Ray Vaughan, one of the key drivers of the 1980s blues revival, used ”Number One” as his main instrument throughout his career. Vaughan acquired the Stratocaster, built from a 1963 body with a 1962 neck and 1959 pickups, from Ray Hennig’s Heart of Texas music store in 1974 and modified it with a black pickguard featuring his initials. Inspired by Jimi Hendrix and Otis Rush, Vaughan added a lefty vibrato. Vaughan played this guitar on his albums with Double Trouble and with his brother Jimmie Vaughan, and he likely used it on David Bowie’s Let’s Dance in 1982, made after the two met at the Montreux Jazz Festival.


Drum Set, Starclassic Lars Ulrich signature seven-piece kit in Magnetic Orange finish with cymbals, 2008

Lars Ulrich uses a seven-piece kit built around the double bass drums that combine with rapidly picked guitars to provide the driving rhythm of Metallica’s music. Ulrich’s setup omits the standard ride cymbal in favor of crash and “trash” cymbals. This iteration of Ulrich’s signature Tama drum kit was made for Metallica’s 2008–10 World Magnetic tour in support of their 2008 album Death Magnetic.


”Union Jack” 500/1 Violin bass, 2012, Höfner Gmbh & Co.

Höfner built this left-handed “violin” bass for Paul McCartney, a career-long Höfner artist, on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth’s Diamond Jubilee celebration concert in 2012. The instrument’s Union Jack design pays tribute to not only the queen but also the legacy of the 1960s British Invasion, a transatlantic movement in which British musicians influenced by American pop brought their own music to the United States. McCartney used this bass to perform the concert’s closing number, the Beatles’ “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” joined onstage by the celebration’s other performers.

500/1 ”Violin Bass”, ca. 1962

The Höfner 500/1 “Violin” electric bass was developed in 1955 by Walter Höfner, son of the company’s founder, and introduced the following year. His idea was to create an instrument whose look would appeal to upright bass players and whose construction would be familiar to his workers trained in traditional violin building. Paul McCartney played a bass identical to this one in the Beatles’ 1964 performances on The Ed Sullivan Show, which initiated a long-standing nickname for the Höfner violin bass, the “Beatle bass.”


Modified Hammond L-100, ca. 1960s

This Hammond L-100 organ was Keith Emerson’s stunt instrument. During improvisations, he would stick knives between its keys to hold down notes, jump on it, and pull it on top of himself. His technicians specially modified the L-100 to withstand these destructive performances and also added pitch-bending capabilities. The organ was retired after it burst into flames during a performance.


”Punk Bass” Custom FB4, ca. 1998

Flea’s most recognizable bass guitar from his career with the Red Hot Chili Peppers is this custom instrument made by Modulus, a maker known for its basses that combine traditional woods with materials more common in the field of aerospace engineering. Flea covered the red, white, and blue bass in stickers featuring his favorite punk bands, nicknamed it the “Punk bass,” and used it extensively for the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ By the Way album and tour (2002–3). Modulus produced a Flea signature model bass based on this design.


Super ’78 Eruption, 2018

This 2018 Super ’78 Eruption guitar is an exact replica of the original configuration of Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstein” guitar, which he constructed himself from various spare guitar parts. His original decoration used white spray paint for the body with black intersecting stripes. After this was widely copied, Van Halen repainted the guitar red with white-and-black stripes, its now-iconic configuration.

Eddie Van Halen, a self-taught guitarist, created a new vocabulary on his instrument through an array of jaw-dropping techniques and electronic effects. Two-handed tapping, in which both hands sound the strings from the fingerboard, allowed him to produce fluid phrases at dizzying speeds. Van Halen’s use of “dive bombing,” depressing and releasing the vibrato bar to create dramatic descents and ascents in pitch, drove innovations in guitar design such as the locking vibrato system and ushered in new standards in virtuosic hard- rock and metal performance.


Les Paul TV Special, 1961

Steve Miller received this guitar from Leslie West of the Vagrants and Mountain in 1967 or 1968. It was originally painted a pale yellow that Gibson developed to appear white on black-and-white television. Miller had the guitar repainted with intricate psychedelic designs by surfboard artist Bob Cantrell and changed the pickup covers, tuners, and controls to match the new color scheme. He used it extensively in recordings and live performances through the 1970s, including on Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert in 1973 and The Midnight Special in 1974.


Esquire-Telecaster composite, 1953-1954

Bruce Springsteen used this modified Fender guitar, composed of a Telecaster body and an Esquire neck, as his primary instrument in countless live performances and recordings from 1972 until about 2005. On the iconic Born to Run (1975) album cover and tour poster, Springsteen faces away from the viewer with this guitar slung over his back. The instrument also appears on the covers for Live/1975–85 (1986), Human Touch (1992), and Wrecking Ball (2012). Springsteen told the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, “When I put it on, I don’t feel like I have a guitar on. It’s such an integral part of me.”


Love Symbol, 1993

In 1993, Prince became embroiled in a contract dispute with his label, Warner Brothers, which sought to limit his prolific output to suit the pace of the marketing department. To reclaim his artistic independence, he changed his name to [symbol] and began appearing in concerts with the word “slave” written across his face in protest of the industry. As part of his new identity as the artist formerly known as Prince, he had instrument maker Jerry Auerswald design and build this guitar in the shape of his eponymous symbol. Prince used variations and copies of this instrument in live performances, including at the 2007 Super Bowl halftime show.


Left: ”The Fool” SG, 1964

In 1967, Cream’s manager Robert Stigwood commissioned Dutch artists Marijke Koger and Simon Posthuma to create a custom-painted set of psychedelic instruments, costumes, and posters for the band’s upcoming U.S. tour. This guitar became known as “the Fool” after the art collective that Koger and Posthuma later founded. Eric Clapton received the guitar from George Harrison before it was painted and went on to use it as one of his main instruments with Cream, playing it while recording Disraeli Gears (1967), Wheels of Fire (1968), and Goodbye (1969). “The Fool” was restored after 1972 by former owner Todd Rundgren.

Right: Bass VI, 1962

Dutch artists Marijke Koger and Simon Posthuma painted this six-string electric bass for Cream’s Jack Bruce as part of a set of psychedelic instruments that also included a decorated drum head for Ginger Baker’s kit and an electric guitar for Eric Clapton (on view nearby). Koger and Posthuma founded a collective known as the Fool and went on to create designs for many top bands. For the Beatles, they designed and painted costumes, an automobile, and the mural on the Apple Corps music building in London. The Fool released their own psychedelic folk album in 1969.

Stratocaster, left-handed, 1993

Kurt Cobain of Nirvana demolished this guitar at the climax of a performance in Inglewood, California, during the 1993 tour in support of In Utero. He destroyed the bridge pickup by using his technician’s drill, allegedly to impress Eddie Van Halen, who was in attendance.


Custom Five-Neck Guitar, 1981

An unusual five-neck guitar has been a feature in guitarist Rick Nielsen’s performances with Cheap Trick. After a period of playing live with multiple guitars strapped on simultaneously, he began collaborating with Hamer in 1981 to combine all of his needs into one outlandish instrument. This guitar, Nielsen’s first of its kind, was built by laminating together the bodies of five Hamer Specials. Nielsen went on to commission and perform with several other five-neck instruments, each with a different configuration.


From ”Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock and Roll” an exhibition co-organized with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, ran through October 2019.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

June 1st, 2019

Reich Richter Pärt

Reich Richter Pärt, an immersive live performance and exhibition in two parts—one conceived by composer Steve Reich and painter Gerhard Richter, the other by Richter and composer Arvo Pärt—explored the shared sensory language of visual art and music. The Richter Pärt partnership built on a concept developed by Alex Poots and Hans Ulrich Obrist for the Manchester International Festival and featured a live performance of Pärt’s captivating choral composition surrounded by Richter’s new work, including wallpaper and three jacquard tapestries. [source: The Shed] & [short video: Gerhard Richter]

The Shed, Apr 6 – Jun 2, 2019

April 13th, 2019

What is Good Design?

Elevating the functional to a timeless work of art.

Fiat 500f Berlina – 1968. The bestselling version of the Cinquecento, it remained in production until 1973
Resilient Chair, 1948-49 by Eva Zeisel || Stone on Stone fabric, c. 1950 by Vera Neumann
Floor lamp, c. 1950 by Serge Mouille
Werra 135mm film camera, c. 1955-1960. Manufactured by Zeiss-Werk, Jena, East Germany (DDR) || Microphone (model MD8-C), 1962 by Marko Turk. Manufactured by Elektroakusticni Laboratorij, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia
Lumio Book Lamp, 2013 by Max Gunawan
Communications receiver (model S-40A), 1947 by Raymond Loewy Associates

“Is there art in a broomstick? Yes, says Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art, if it is designed both for usefulness and good looks.” This quote, from a 1953 Time magazine review of one of MoMA’s mid-century Good Design exhibitions, gets to the heart of a question the Museum has been asking since its inception: What is good design and how can it enhance everyday life?

Featuring objects from domestic furnishings and appliances to ceramics, glass, electronics, transport design, sporting goods, toys, and graphics, The Value of Good Design explored the democratizing potential of design, beginning with MoMA’s Good Design initiatives from the late 1930s through the 1950s, which championed well-designed, affordable contemporary products. [source: MoMA]

The Value of Good Design
Feb 10–Jun 15, 2019
MoMA

April 4th, 2019

Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes

The Language of the Underworld || 2017 || Acrylic and charcoal on linen
Moky || 2013 || Acrylic, oil, and charcoal on linen
Lady Moth || 2017 || Acrylic and charcoal on linen
Mana Hatta || 2017 || Acrylic and charcoal on linen
Solo Dolo || 2010 || Acrylic, oil, and charcoal on linen
P. || 2008 || Acrylic, charcoal, and pastel crayon on linen

The largest US museum survey of this pioneering artist to date, Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes featured more than thirty large-scale paintings that revealed the artist’s considerable influence in the field of contemporary art.

One of the most inventive artists working today, von Heyl has earned international acclaim for continually rethinking the possibilities of contemporary painting. Her cerebral yet deeply visceral artworks upend longstanding assumptions about composition, beauty, and narrative. Drawing inspiration from a vast and surprising array of sources—including literature, pop culture, metaphysics, and personal history—von Heyl creates paintings that are seemingly familiar yet impossible to classify, offering, in her words, “a new image that stands for itself as fact.”

In studios in New York and Marfa, Texas, von Heyl combines a rigorous, process-based practice that demands each painting develop through the act of painting itself. The spellbinding results invite viewers to explore a unique visual language that is both exuberant and insistent.

Snake Eyes ran at The Hirshhorn from November 2018 to April 2019.

March 18th, 2019

Jan Tschichold and the New Typography

Jan Tschichold: From Calligraphy to Penguin Books

Jan Tschichold was the most important typographer of the twentieth century; his career framed many of the great debates in graphic design. Trained as a calligrapher in German Gothic script, he rejected this ”nationalist” approach in favor of a style inspired by avant-garde Constructivist art. He even briefly changed his name to ”Ivan” in sympathy with Soviet art and politics. His writings helped define the New Typography, a movement that sought to make printed text and imagery dynamic, efficient, and attuned to the demands of modern life. Tschichold’s designs and theories were controversial and provoked hostility from conservative critics. Imprisoned by the Nazis in 1933, Tschichold and his family escaped to Switzerland, where he began to question the values of modernism. By 1947, when he was appointed design director of Penguin Books in London, he was advocating a return to classical design principles: orderliness, clarity, and uniformity.

In March 1947, Tschichold became design director of Penguin Books in London, the world’s largest paperback publisher. To ensure consistency across the firm’s books, one of his first tasks was to standardize the horizontal grid and color schemes that Edward Young had established in 1935: orange for fiction, green for crime, purple for biography, etc.

Designer unknown
Pelikan carbon paper packaging, after 1928
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Jan Tschichold Collection

9949Jan Tschichold (Swiss German, 1902-1974)
Buster Keaton in: ”Der General” Phoebus-Palast Poster, 1927
The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Jan Tschichold (Swiss German, 1902-1974)
Phoebus-Palast: Music and Film Performances by rank; program, 1927
The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Johannes Molzahn (German, 1892-1965)
Dwelling and Workplace poster, 1929
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Jan Tschichold Collection

Max Burchartz (German, 1887-1961)
International Exhibition: Art of Advertising poster, Essen 1931
The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Paul Schuitema (Dutch, 1897-1973)
Nutricia, le lait en poudre advertisement, 1927-28
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Jan Tschichold Collection

The New Typography was a movement based in Germany during the period of the Weimar Republic (1918-33) that sought to make printed text and imagery a dynamic expression of modern life. Proponents advocated adopting asymmetrical layouts, sanserif letterforms, and integrating photography with text in a manner that expressed a new sensibility, shaped by advertising and the mass media. Jan Tschichold, a young typographer trained in Leipzig, was the author of the landmark texts ”elementare typographie” (1925) and Die neue Typographie (1928), which did much to define the movement. Tschichold contacted many leading artist-designers throughout Europe and the Soviet Union to acquire examples of their finest designs and added them to his personal collection, most of which is now in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

From the ”Jan Tschichold and the New Typography” exhibition @ Bard Graduate Center (February – July 2019)

March 02nd, 2019

Frida & I

And a lot more on display in Brooklyn Museum.

Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving was ongoing, a collection of her clothing, jewelry, and other personal possessions like her corsets and prosthetics (themselves works of art), which were rediscovered and inventoried in 2004 after being locked away since Kahlo’s death, in 1954. Photography was strictly prohibited and all I managed was a couple of sneak pics. But, as is always the case in a museum, a whole world of other treasures is waiting to be discovered, photographed, and shared.

Ceremonial Wine Vessel on a Wheeled Phoenix, early 18th century
China, Qing dynasty


Head of Wesirwer, Priest of Montu
Green schist
Late Period, Dynasty XXX, ca 380-342 B.C.


Figure of a Recumbent Jackal (God Anubis)
Wood
Late Period-Ptolemaic Period, ca. 664-30 B.C.E.
From Saqqara


Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving


Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving


Ran Hwang (South Korean, b. 1960)
East Wind, 2012
Plastic and metal buttons and beads, metal pins, wood panel


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregation 18-JA006 (Star 1), 2018
Mixed media with Korean mulberry paper


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations (detail)


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregations


Kwang Young Chun
Born Hongchun, South Korea, 1944
Aggregation 15-AU043, 2015
Mixed media with Korean mulberry paper


Philip Pearlstein, b. 1924
Portrait of Linda Nochlin and Richard Pommer, 1968
Oil on canvas


Joan Semmel, b. 1932
Intimacy-Autonomy, 1974
Oil on canvas


Brookyn Museum

February 16th, 2019

Brenda Starr, Reporter: The Art of Dale Messick

Brenda Starr, Reporter debuted in June of 1940 and was an immediate hit with young women and girls. Brenda Starr’s name came from a 1930’s debutante, Brenda Frazier, and her body, fashion sense, and persona mirrored leading Hollywood actress, Rita Hayworth, complete with matching long red hair and a curvaceous figure.

At its peak, Brenda Starr, Reporter was included in 250 newspapers and read by more than 60 million readers. When Starr and her long-time “Mystery Man” boyfriend, whose very survival depended on the serum found in the fictitious but famous black orchid, finally married after 36 years in 1976, President Gerald Ford sent a congratulatory telegram. [source]

Random squares from an exhibition @ The Society of Illustrators

February 9th, 2019