Funny Ladies at The New Yorker: Cartoonists Then and Now

”With the vote won in 1920, and a new found freedom, many women moved to the city to find work. In 1925, journalist Harold Ross and his wife Jane Grant, a reporter for the New York Times, created The New Yorker, a humor magazine for the urban elite. When Ross began to look for talent to contribute to this new endeavor, he sought the best. Some of the best included cartoonists who were women; with the support of The New Yorker, they became some of the most heralded cartoonists the art form has known.” [source]

”I’m going to leave him – I’m tired of being Duse* inside.” – by Barbara Shermund

*Eleonora Duse (1858-1924) was an Italian actress, often known simply as Duse. She is regarded as one of the greatest actresses of all time, noted for her total assumption of the roles she portrayed.”

Barbara Shermund
Dear no, Miss Matberry – just the head.” – by Mary Petty
Doris Matthews
Liza Donnelly
Mary Lawton
Carolita Johnson
Liana Finck
Victoria Roberts
Pia Guerra
Maggie Larson
Maggie Larson
Bishakh Som
Julia Suits
Nurit Karlin
Nurit Karlin
Kim Warp
Kim Warp
Roz Chast

These were just a few of the many talents showcasing their work in this exhibition, their creative, witty personalities expressed in their cartoons and beyond – as in Roz Chast’s bio, above.

All of the cartoons shown in the exhibition were published in The New Yorker magazine, © The New Yorker & the artist. The majority of art is the property of the cartoonist.

The Society of Illustrators

July 28th, 2018