Little Nothings || Good Deeds

A trip to Pennsylvania. Two stops on the way to Farmington. First, Intercourse. I’m sure it was not done on purpose, but the name still makes me laugh. Kitchen Kettle is a a village of shops with locally-made goodies and eateries – touristy but great for lunch and snacks.

Early evening in Gettysburg. One could learn everything about the American Civil War by walking the streets of this lovely town. Or just take home a little nothing for fun. Until recently, I thought one could meet Greeks everywhere; now I realize that it is Poles who hold this record. No matter where we go, all kinds of Polish shops keep popping up.

The building you see above, is the Gettysburg Lincoln Railroad Station where President Lincoln arrived the evening before he delivered the Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Gettysburg Soldiers’ National Cemetery.

It was November 19, 1863, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg. It is one of the best-known speeches in American history.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

September 1st, 2018

 

Charles Towne Landing

In 1663, a group of eight aristocratic Englishmen received an amazing gift from their king: a giant piece of North America’s Atlantic coastline called ”Carolina”. King Charles II’s land grant gave these men – known as the ”Lords Proprietors” – millions of square miles of land between present-day Charleston and the Pacific Ocean. According the the king’s degree – but without permission from the native people already living here – these group of English lords assumed almost king-like power over the soon-to-be-formed colony of Carolina. 

It was 1670, when the Lords landed here and went on to establish the birthplace of the Carolina colony. Aboard their ship, were a group of free men and a few women, as well as slaves brought from Barbados, but descended from centuries-old cultures and kingdoms of West Africa.

Today, Charles Towne Landing is a State Historic Site introducing visitors to the brutal beginnings of Charleston – a city built on slavery and land appropriation – with an exhibition space appealing to history aficionados of all ages, a replica 17th-century cargo ship one can board and explore, wonderful gardens with an oak alley, trails for hiking, a natural habitat zoo… in short so interesting, they had to kick us out at 5 p.m. because they closing!

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

Charleston, SC

April 13th, 2018

Forget Viagra Eat Oysters

Also, if you’re really hungry, you might want to try those utterly delicious, palate titillating lump crab cakes of Faidley’s, this Baltimore Institution that has remained a family affair for three generations, today owned and operated by Bill and Nancy Devine.

Mrs. Devine, grandaughter of the founder John W. Faidley, Sr., is still very much actively involved; a lovely sight behind the counter, supervising, tasting, adjusting, dressed to the nines and self-assured, exuding the kind of confidence achieved by a life-time of work and an experience passed down from one generation to another.

Faidley’s is located inside Lexington Market, one of the oldest continuously operating food markets in the country and a a not-to-be-missed landmark on its own right. A pair of Faidley’s crab cakes is an added bonus – you just can’t leave Baltimore without tasting them at least once!

Faidley’s Seafood

April 26th, 2017

Assassin’s Creed

Today, we’ll take a tour at Ford’s Theatre, famous for being ”The site of President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination”. But, first, here’s a shot of the country’s federal law enforcement body – the F.B.I., just a few steps away. Too bad it hadn’t yet existed in Lincoln’s time!The tour starts across the street, in the gift shop, until it’s time to join the line outside the theatre. The line forms outside rain or shine, so come prepared on rainy days.   There is some free time in the museum, where one can learn more about the plot, see the gun used in Lincoln’s assassination and look at family photos, including those of Lincoln’s son William, who passed away when he was just 11 years old, ill with typhoid. 

Ford’s Theatre photographed by Mathew Brady between 1862 and 1975.


Finally, the theatre where our ranger came on stage to tell one of the greatest crime stories of all time. It goes like this:

”On April 14, 1865, in full view of a theatre audience packed to the walls and celebrating the impending end of a brutal war, the President of the United States was assassinated. The murderer was not only seen by all, he was instantly recognizable to most. And he got away…”

You can take a virtual tour and uncover aspects of the plot, on Ford’s Theatre website.

April 24th, 2017