Obsession || Nudes by Klimt, Schiele and Picasso *Safe For Telework*

From the Scofield Thayer Collection.

Scofield Thayer (1889-1982) was editor and co-owner of the Dial, a journal that published writing and art by the European and American avant-garde from 1919 to 1926. An aesthete, he was a brilliant abstract thinker and a complex, conflicted personality. In the early 1920s, Thayer underwent psychoanalysis with Sigmund Freud in Vienna. While in Europe, he assembled a large collection of some six hundred artworks – mostly works on paper – with staggering speed, acquiring them from artists and dealers in Vienna, London, Paris and Berlin.

While Pablo Picasso’s work had been shown in America, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele were unknown in this country at that time. Both artists were remarkable for their frank portrayals of female nudity and sexuality.

In 1924 a selection from Thayer’s collection was exhibited at a New York gallery and won acclaim, but it found little favour when shown in his native city of Worcester, Massachusetts. Offended by intolerant views toward provocative art, Thayer drew up his will in 1925, leaving his collection to The Met before retreating from public life until his death in 1982.

An exhibition of the bequest has been planned since its arrival at the Museum in 1984, but its diversity, unevenness and vast quantity proved a challenge. While a select group of paintings by artists of the School of Paris is always on view, the light-sensitive watercolours, drawings and prints have been rarely displayed. This exhibition, held on the centenary of the 1918 deaths of Klimt and Schiele, presented these erotic and evocative works together for the first time.

It ran from July through October 2018 at The Met Breuer.

Egon Schiele || Sorrow, 1914 || Drypoint


Egon Schiele || Squatting Woman, 1914 || Drypoint


Egon Schiele || Girl, 1918 || Lithograph


Egon Schiele || Reclining Nude with Boots, 1918 || Charcoal on paper


Egon Schiele || Standing Nude with Orange Drapery (recto): Study of Nude with Arms Raised (verso), 1914 || Watercolor, gouache and graphite on paper


Egon Schiele || Nude in Black Stockings, 1917 || Watercolor and charcoal on paper


Egon Schiele || Observed in a Dream, 1911 || Watercolor and graphite on paper


Egon Schiele || Two Reclining Nudes, 1911 || Watercolor and graphite on paper


Egon Schiele || Self-Portrait, 1911 || Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper


Egon Schiele || Seated Nude in Shoes and Stockings, 1918 || Charcoal on paper


Gustav Klimt || Reclining Nude with Drapery, 1912-13 || Graphite


Gustav Klimt || Two Studies for a Crouching Woman, 1914–15 || Graphite


Pablo Picasso || Fondevila, 1906 || Oil on canvas


Pablo Picasso || Head of a Woman, 1922 || Chalk on paper


Pablo Picasso || Erotic Scene (La Douceur), 1903 || Oil on canvas


The Met Breuer

August 19th, 2018

Met Breuer

Edvard Munch always makes a strong impression but, in this case, the same can be said about the host building. This is Met Breuer, built in 1966 and named after its Brutalist architect Marcel Breuer, who designed it to house the Whitney Museum – and so it did until 2015, when the Whitney moved to its current location in downtown Manhattan, and this beautiful concrete ”inverted ziggurat” was leased by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Artwork from “Delirious Art at the Limits of Reason 1950-1980”, an exhibition running in parallel to Edvard Munch’s “Between the Clock and the Bed”.

 

Credits:

Cob II, 1977-80 by Nancy Grossman
Wood, leather, painted horn, lacquer, lead

13/3, 1981 by Sol LeWitt
Painted balsa wood

Beginning Study for Changes and Communication, 1978 by Alfred Jensen
Oil on canvas

Three Mirror Vortex, 1965 by Robert Smithson
Stainless steel, three mirrors

My Father Pledged Me a Sword, 1975, by Anselm Kiefer
Watercolour, gouache, coloured pencil and ballpoint pen on paper

Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue, Manhattan

December 28th, 2017

Edvard Munch Art

As intrigued as I was in discovering Munch the Photographer, I couldn’t wait to renew my acquaintance with some of the inspiring, melancholic and – at times – tormented, works of Munch the Painter; and be reminded that there’s more loneliness in Munch the Man and a deeper agony than what he let us see/hear with ”The Scream”.

Self-Portrait, 1886
Oil on canvas


Self-Portrait with Cigarette, 1895
Oil on canvas


Self-Portrait with the Spanish Flu, 1919
Oil on canvas


Self-Portrait with a Bottle of Wine, 1906
Oil on canvas


Self-Portrait by the Window, ca. 1940
Oil on canvas


Inheritance, 1897-99
Oil on canvas


The Sick Child, 1896
Oil on canvas


Sick Mood at Sunset: Despair, 1892
Oil on canvas


Despair, 1894
Oil on canvas


Death in the Sick Room, 1893
Oil on canvas


Madonna, ca. 1895-97
Oil on canvas


Puberty, 1894
Oil on unprimed canvas


Ashes, 1925
Oil on canvas


Jealousy, ca. 1907
Oil on canvas


Model by the Wicker Chair, 11919-21
Oil on canvas


Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed @ Met Breuer, November 2107 – February 2018.

December, 28th 2017