Veins of the Earth || Two || The Grand Prismatic Spring

Feel the heat alongside it and then climb the trail to the Overlook for some spectacular views. Meanwhile, click on the last photo – it’s panoramic.

The Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook is reached via the Fairy Falls Trail, an easy walk except for the last part reaching the overlook platform, which is a bit steep. You will meet wildlife on the way – just remember: keep calm and steer clear. These are wild animals and you are trespassing their territory. If they feel threatened they will charge – and they are faster and more agile than you think! The bison you see below had just attacked a silly man who went one step too far to take a selfie. Fortunately, the man got away with a warning – others may not be so lucky.

Yellowstone National Park

June 2nd, 2018

Winter(?)

Spring rather, springled with snow as we drove on Highway 20 (which is actually closed in winter). Admiring the view from Lake Butte over the Yellowstone Lake. There is a starck beauty around us, in this area that has been devastated by wildfire. Yet Hope, is always the last to die.

Yellowstone National Park

May 28th, 2018

At the end of the day [four]

Just when you think it can’t get any better.

Airplane views of Chicago from The Signature Room at the 95th, a cocktail bar located, well, on the 95th floor of the 360 Chicago tower, better known as the John Hancock Center. The cocktails must be good but who would remember after experiencing these dizzying views?

As if to prepare us for the experience, an explosion of light at the lobby: Lucent, an installation by Wolfgang Buttress, representing the 3,106 brightest stars visible with the naked eye from the Earth’s Northern hemisphere.

And, finally, a smooth landing back to Earth, walking past the iconic Wrigley Building on N Michigan Avenue.

Chicago by night on November 5th, 2017

Room with a View

Canada and the U.S. share the benefits of one of the world’s top tourist destinations with boat tours, walking tours, honeymoon packages, helicopter rides, resorts and casinos and all kinds of development to the detriment of the natural beauty of the environment but to the ultimate excitement of the millions of tourists that flock to Niagara Falls every year.

But for the best armchair views from your private booth you have to cross to Canada and book a ”falls view – high floor” room in one of the major chained-brand hotels that are lined along the Canadian side of the falls. The views are simply hypnotic.

Niagara Falls, ON, Canada

A day trip to Poughkeepsie

First, I was intrigued by the Native American name. Looking for its meaning, I found out that it is a mispronunciation of a Native American word referring to the location of a spring of fresh water that was used by the first travelers as a rest stop on the trail that ran along the river. Poughkeepsie is derived from ”uppuqui ipis ing”, uppuqui pronounced oo-poo-kee, and it means ”the reed-covered lodge by the little water-place”. [source]

Then, came an episode of the ”Great American Railroad Journeys”, a BBC travel documentary in which Michael Portillo crosses the United States by train using an 1879 copy of Appleton’s Guidebook. In this episode, Portillo makes a stop on his way to Albany, to walk across the former Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge, built in 1889.

In Appleton’s time the bridge existed on paper only but, just ten years later there it was, the first Hudson River rail crossing north of New York City, intended to move mostly freight from Midwest to New England. In peak times, as many as 50 trains a day used to cross the bridge, but by 1974, when it was destroyed by fire, the traffic had dropped to one train a day.

The fire may have been extinguished but the damaged bridge remained closed, in disrepair for 35 years, until October 2009 when it was reopened as Walkway Over the Hudson with funding by the State and Federal government bodies responsible for historic preservation, private philanthropic organisations, but mainly the initiative and extensive support  by local residents.

At 1,28 miles – just over 2 km long, it claims the first place as the longest, elevated pedestrian bridge in the world. Open daily from 7 am to sunset, easily reached from Manhattan: a two-hour trip running mostly alongside the Hudson, on Metro-North from Grand Central Terminal.

Attention, however, you need to plan accordingly: except for the obvious breezy conditions one may expect on a bridge, it can get really hot (as in boiling) on this particular one. There is nowhere to hide from the sun and relief will come only once you’ve crossed on either side and especially Highland, where the Hudson Valley Rail Trail continues for miles under the welcome leafy shade.

August 13th, 2017