A patio from a Spanish castle, 16th century ceiling tiles and some recent acquisitions

All on view at The Met. Some of humanity’s greatest accomplishments sitting together in one of the world’s greatest museums.

Like these mid-16th century ceiling tiles from Seville.

Or this entire patio from the castle at Vélez Blanco of Almeria, an example of early sixteenth-century Spanish architecture. 

Or these little gems of recent acquisitions 

Katsumi Watanabe
Untitled, 1966, Gelatin silver print

Watanabe was an itinerant portrait photographer who worked in the Shinjuku section of Tokyo during the 1960s and 1970s, mostly in the blue-light district of Kabukicho that was populated nightly with Yakuza, cross-dressers and prostitutes. His pictures, made with a strobe flash, were by necessity collaborative, as his subjects had to be pleased with their likeness before paying his set fee of two hundred yen for three prints. 


Elisabeth Hase
Down Stairs, ca. 1948, Gelatin silver print

In this self-portrait, Hase appears to have tripped, or perhaps to have thrown herself, face-down on a flight of stairs. In her most intriguing work, including this example, the artist experimented with staged scenarios and narratives exploring feminine identity, as would Cindy Sherman half a century later. Another such self-portrait shows her enacting a tearful confession to an anonymous clergyman. Hase turned to photography after beginning her career in the early 1920s as a student of avant-garde graphic design and typography. Despite being a lesser-known photographer, she established a studio in Frankfurt and pursued a variety of subjects, including portraits and still lifes, street scenes, modern architectural views and botanical studies. 


Unknown American Artist
Brooklyn Bridge, New York, ca. 1883, Albumen silver print from glass negative

When it opened for use on May 24, 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world; it immediately became an essential subject for photographers working in or visiting New York as well as an iconic feature of the city’s skyline. Despite the bridge’s instant landmark status, early large-format view such as this one are rare. Now 133 years old, the soaring granite towers and steel cables of the Brooklyn Bridge carry roughly 150.000 vehicles and pedestrians every day.


The Metropolitan Museum of Art
March 19th, 2017

6 thoughts on “A patio from a Spanish castle, 16th century ceiling tiles and some recent acquisitions

  1. time to pack our bags… sigh, if only. love the met, saw nicole kidman in the cafe once, but she wasnt so famous yet… plus she was alone! (more photos from the met? yours are so good & great subjects)

    Liked by 1 person

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