Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse || Beacon of Freedom

”For most of its history Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse was manned by keepers of the US Lighthouse Service, and later the US Coast Guard. As an isolated station, Seven Foot Knoll was designed for three keepers – a principal and two assistants – which allowed for regular rotations ashore.

The duties of keepers were often routine but were nonetheless essential. Each night at sundown the beacon lamp was lit and had to remain so until sunrise the following morning – a task which required vigilance and regular maintenance. Each morning, the beacon lens and lamp were thoroughly cleaned and made ready for use that evening. In times of fog, the fog bell had to be sounded continuously which required winding the station’s bell machine every 45 minutes until the fog lifted.”

This vibrant red round feature was built in 1855, the oldest surviving screw-pile lighthouse in Maryland. Originally located at the mouth of Patapsco River, its light shone for the first time on January 10, 1856 and it continued doing so for 133 years, marking the safe approach to Baltimore. Replaced by modern navigational aids, it was subsequently relocated to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. These days, it houses historical exhibits and consists part of the Baltimore Maritime Museum.

 Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

April 27th, 2017

A bookstore with a steampunk feel

The reason Barnes & Noble in Inner Harbor looks particularly interesting, is that it is built inside a former power plant with part of its interior intact. The store offers a cafe, views over the harbour from the second level, a small aquarium, an audiovisual section, gifts and, of course, loads and loads of books – all displayed around some of the power plant’s original features. And although it is part of a larger complex of shops and restaurants, it takes a bookstore with a distinct steampunk feel to produce such a winning combination.  

April 26th, 2017

Baltimore – A long walk around the Inner Harbor

So what if it’s touristy – Baltimore’s Inner Harbor offers endless car-free walks with wonderful views of the harbour, away from the hectic rhythm of the city. 

Above, views from the Baltimore Public Works Museum. Below, walking up the steps to the Federal Hill Park and what looks like an upscale neighbourhood with neat townhouses and lovely little gardens. 

Back at the Inner Harbor and that very interesting building housing Barnes & Noble; we’ll have to have a look inside before leaving.

But first, Little Italy by night for some delicious pasta washed down with copious amounts of chianti and a splendid grappa for desert.

And, finally, back to our very old-world, very ambient B&B for a good night’s sleep. 

April 26th, 2017