A touch of Gotham (in case you missed New York)

The first two images are from the former Mount Vernon Church, designed by architect Charles Howard Walker and built ca. 1892 on the corner of Beacon Street and Massachusetts Avenue, in Back Bay. It functioned as a congregational church until 1970 when it was closed; it was destroyed by fire in 1978.

In 1983 the remains were imaginatively restored by architect Graham Gund who decided to keep the existing church structure – tower included – and combine it with a modern building. The result was today’s Church Court Condominiums, one of the most interesting residential buildings in Boston. I wonder whether the tower has been converted into a loft – just imagine the views!

The next three images are details from an office building, located at 60 Massachusetts Ave. 

Details about the building’s course from Church to luxury condos can be found on Back Bay Houses.

May 1st, 2017

Dorchester Heights Park, Boston

”At this place the cannon brought by General Henry Knox from Fort Ticonderoga to deliver to General George Washington in the winter of 1775-1776 were used to force the British Army to evacuate Boston.”

Besides its historical role and significance, this is a quite neighbourhood park with views over South Boston, surrounded by rows of beautiful houses. Especially ambient at dusk, when the first city lights begin to flicker in the distance.

April 30th, 2017

Cityscapes || Chelsea to Hell’s Kitchen

via Hudson Yards

The ”Mirror” Building, aka the Jean Nouvel Building.
Actually, its windows are multicoloured and, like the Gehry Building (see below), it changes appearance according to the time of day, weather and light.


The Shadow Building, aka the Frank Gehry Building, aka the IAC Building. As all structures designed by Frank Gehry, it looks different from every angle like a fascinating work of art.


The Chinese Consulate. It got my attention because, as far as I have seen, it is the only one situated on the West Side. And Hell’s Kitchen (as opposed to Upper West Side or Chelsea, for example), is a rather unusual location for a Consulate, but a very welcome one for the neighbourhood, especially during the Chinese New Year festivities which include fireworks over the Hudson River that are, apparently, spectacular! I’m eagerly waiting for this year’s announcement, but have already bookmarked the day: February 15th, eve of the Chinese New Year 2018, and the place: Pier 84, 12th Ave & 44th St.


Perspective of the Silver Towers, twin 60-story residential buildings designed by one of New York’s most prolific architects, the Greek born Costas Kondylis (another, less glass-towery building of his, we’ve seen here).


April 2nd, 2017

That crooked little street called Gay

Built in the 1820s as a row of horse stables for the wealthy living in nearby Waverly Place, it served successively as a low-income housing for their servants, home to black musicians, a den for artists and writers, a shelter for speakeasies during the ’20s. No one knows exactly why it is called Gay. There are a few theories but not much evidence – the Bowery Boys have more on this on their website.

Gay St., Greenwich Village

April 2nd, 2017