MoMA PS1 + 1 (The Art is in the details)

The Art is in the stairwells, meeting face-to-face with Abigail Lazkoz’s agonizing Cameramen; walking In the Woods, deep into Ernesto Caivano’s dark, magical forest; bathed in nature’s ephemeral reflections, outside in the courtyard.

Stairwell art:

Abigail Lazkoz: Cameraman

Abigail Lazkoz created the series Cameramen in 2002 and displayed it for the first time in MoMA PS1’s exhibition Greater New York 2005. The work consists of three large-scale drawings that reinterpret Jose Guadaulpe Posada’s 1914 engraving Se Aproxima el Fin del Mundo Las Profecias Se Cumplen Temblores, Erupciones, Guerras, Pestes, Hambres E Incendios. La Celebre Madre Matiana (The end of the World is Near, Prophecies Come True, Earthquakes, Eruptions, Wars Diseases, Famine, and Fires).

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Ernesto Caivano: In the Woods

For MoMA PS1’s stairwell A, Ernesto Caivano created a wall mural based on an ongoing story he developed over three years called After the Woods. While After the Woods consists of drawings and paper sculptures, In the Woods is composed of black latex paint and gouache to create a dense visual web of images composing Caivano’s larger-than-life sized environment. The exaggerated scale of the piece creates a total experience for the viewer, allowing an escape into this imaginary world. Naked and gnarled tree branches wind around the walls and sprout up and out onto the ceiling, entangling the viewer in their dark and magical embrace.

March 24th, 2018

An intergalactic brunch

Under Marc Chagall’s murals and the iconic ”sputnik” chandeliers. Donated by the Republic of Austria as a gesture of thanks for the American initiative to mobilize the Marshall Plan, an aid to Western Europe to help rebuild its economy after the end of World World II, the ”sputniks” were designed by Hans Harald Rath for the historic glassware company Lobmeyr and were installed in 1966. 11 of them are in the lobby and 21 light up the auditorium. 

Metropolitan Opera House
Lincoln Center

May 14th, 2017

 

A moment of national pride

An exhibition of a series of photographs by the official photographer of the 1896 Olympic Games, Albert Meyer. Traveling in U.S. cities, it arrived in New York where it was hosted at the U.N. Headquarters and the N.Y. Greek Consulate.

A rare opportunity to get a glimpse into events and athletes of the first Modern Olympics.

Beautifully arranged at the sun-drenched exhibition space, in front of the magnificent Peace mural by Candido Portinari.

Athens 1896: The First Modern Olympic Games
The Olympic Games of 1896 constitute a breakthrough in the history of sports events. The revival of the ancient tradition transformed international sports meetings into the global events we know today.
One of the famous photographers of that period was the well-travelled and American educated German, Albert Meyer (Dresden 1857-1924). Meyer traveled to Athens for the Games and became the official photographer of the German Team.
The 25 rather Spartan photographs of his album capture the chronicles of the Games, documenting both athletic rituals and the athletic labors of the participants.
The photographic studio and archive of Albert Meyer was destroyed in 1945, when allied bombings flattened Dresden, turning the original photographs into rare and priceless artifacts.
Among the members of the organizing committee who received one of the rare leather albums was its Secretary George Streit, banker and minister of the Greek government of the period. Marinos Yeroulanos, his grandson and President of the Board of Trustees of the Benaki Museum, donated the album to the Historical Archives of Museum were it is safeguarded today as a unique token to both History and Art. [extract from the exhibition leaflet]
December 9th, 2016

Happily FAILEd

This giant mural is the work of FAILE, a Brooklyn-based artistic collaboration between Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller. It covers an entire side wall of a building that happens to be The Record Plant, a legendary recording studio on 44th St. in Hell’s Kitchen, active from the late sixties until 1987, when it closed.

Imagine bumping into Aretha Franklin, Frank Zappa, Jimmy Hendrix, John Lennon, Cyndi Lauper, among others – they all recorded here; these are but a few of the names that emerged when I looked up the address.

Today, it is a high-tech business centre and I am desperate for a time-machine.

October 27, 2016