LVoyage – Voyage

In the nineteenth century, the evolution of transportation reduced distances. Steam vessels were put into service in the 1830s, linking Europe to the Americas. Railways in 1848, the invention of the automobile in the 1890s, and the advent of commercial airlines in the 1900s ushered the world towards new habits and life experiences.

Travelling by train meant that one could relax in their sleeping car, socialize over a cocktail in the restaurant, daydream, work, test the latest fashion trends on their fellow passengers. And, more importantly, one did not have to travel light. Desk trunks, library trunks, whole wardrobe trunks, designed to make travelers feel at home away from home, were considered an integral part of an experienced, sophisticated traveler’s baggage. Portable chest (hasami-bako) in black lacquered wood with gold lacquer patterned using the hiramaki-e technique, Edo period, late 18th and 19th century


Ideale Library trunk in monogram canvas, 1927


Desk trunk in natural cowhide, once belonging to Frank J. Gould, 1928


Jenner & Knewstub Berry’s fitted travel bag in leather, ca. 1864


Client records. For each client the house creates a record detailing special orders and customization requests, 19th to 20th century


Milo Anderson, silk satin nightdress worn by Lauren Bacall in ”Young man with a horn”, 1950


Brettes hat/shoe trunk, vanity case in monogram canvas
Alzer suitcase and Stratos case, all once belonging to Lauren Bacall


Satellite suitcases, vanity case, Deauville bag in monogram canvas once belonging to Elizabeth Taylor


Jeanne Lanvin hostess dress, worn by Mary Pickford, Winter 1948-49


Volez
Voguez
Voyager

at the American Stock Exchange Building, through January 7th, 2018.

Admission is free

November 12th, 2017

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